Public Art FORMing

From 10 to 19 April, the Northbridge and Leederville campuses will be transformed with live artwork, as part of FORM’s Public 2015 campaign.

Local and international artists will convert blank spaces in each campus into murals to bring public art to Central and the community.

This year’s artists include Ukrainian duo AEC and Waone, known as Interesni Kazki (‘interesting stories’ in English), as well as Stormie Mills, E.L.K, Fudge and Brett Chan from Australia.

Interesni Kazki will feature in the Northbridge campus and use their surreal and poetic imagery to create their mural on the 25 Aberdeen St building.

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The adjacent Museum Street meanwhile, will see the blank carpark wall turned into a tribute and memorial to the late Robert Hunter, founder of Perth’s Hip hop scene by stencil artist E.L.K.

Leederville on the other hand, will act as a canvas for Australian artists Stormie Mills, Fudge and Brett Chan as they add their colour and creativity to the old buildings.

For the last ten years FORM has been working to build ‘a state of creativity in Western Australia’.

Projects like Public bring art into our public spaces, to spark conversation and engagement in and by the community.

FORM is committed to bringing simple creative programs like Public to WA, simply to promote the public good.

For more information about Public visit FORM’s website

Shine a Light

December 7th will see Leederville come alive and alight for the Light Up Leederville Carnival.

The event will take over the Leederville precinct from 12-8pm with free entertainment and attractions, before culminating with the turning on of the Leederville Christmas lights.

To help make the carnival one to remember, Central students enrolled in a Construct Public Art unit received a grant of $500 from the City of Leederville, to make artwork for the Light Up Carnival.

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Central’s Advanced Diploma of Visual Art students Marcia Espinosa and Barbra Bozsik are creating their own work in the outdoor sculpture workshop at 12 Aberdeen Street for the celebration of all things Leederville.

The Light Up Leederville Carnival will see the streets closed off and the lights turned on, for a day filled with buskers, food, fashion, market stalls, kids land, art installations, pop up bars and much more.

So dress up to come down and celebrate the start of the festive season in one of Perth’s cultural epicentres.

http://www.leedervillecarnival.com.au

Artlinks now on

The 2014 Artlinks Exhibition is on now until November 10 in ‘C’ block of Central’s Leederville campus.

Artlinks offers courses for people with mental illness, physical mental or learning disabilities for a variety of abilities and experience. The classes use a range of media including sculpture, paint, drawing and textiles.

The exhibition is open daily from 8am to 5pm with some artwork for sale.

Sport students train with Soccer legend

Central’s soccer students from the Athlete Development Centre at Leederville were treated to a unique ‘training and talk’ session from one of the world’s greatest female soccer strikers.

Carolina Morace, now an established coach with a pedigree to match her former playing days, was invited to Leederville to coach Certificate IV and Diploma in Sport Development students.

Carolina scored 105 goals for the Italian national team in 153 appearances, a phenomenal strike rate. She was the top scorer in the female Serie A league for eleven consecutive seasons during the 1990s.  She also achieved notoriety for being the first ever woman to coach a professional men’s football team, Viterbese.

She also somehow found time to obtain a law degree and do punditry on Italian TV!

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Carolina was brought to Central by lecturer Claire Middleton as part of a season of talks from individuals who have made it to the top echelons of the sport industry.  Previous speakers have included Kate Starre, a double Olympic gold medallist in hockey, Dana Pimley, Head Sports Trainer with the Fremantle Dockers and Bob Welch a risk management expert who has overseen numerous high profile sporting events.

Carolina’s visit was an amazing opportunity for the students who got to ask questions about her life in the game and journey since completing her UEFA Pro Licence, the highest coaching accreditation available in the game.

Carolina talked about numerous topics including the criteria behind the selection of players and subsequently striving to bring the best out of them.

“With players you are looking at four elements – technical ability, tactical ability, physical ability and personality.  We work with, and look for improvements in, all four of these elements,” she said.

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Information on Central’s Sport training

*For more information on Carolina’s Perth-based soccer coaching academy, visit www.femalefootballacademy.com.au/

 

 

 

 

Dockers in Training

The Fremantle Dockers are committed to providing support and training to their players both during and following their playing careers. They recognize that players need to be ready to tackle life after football and Central Institute of Technology is a contributor towards that goal.

Six Dockers are set to complete their Diploma in Youth Work later this year at Central. Michael Johnson, Stephen Hill, Danyle Pearce, Clancee Pearce, Jonathon Griffin and Michael Walters have all been completing their work-based assessment and training.

The group has been working with Central’s Lena Charlick at the Leederville campus, receiving training that enables them to prepare for life outside football as well as empowering them to further contribute to the community.

The six players have taken an opportunity to gain new skills and a qualification that compliments their current, ongoing community work.

They are already heavily involved in a number of community projects including mentoring vulnerable youths and visiting remote communities.

Today’s footballers are more than just sportsmen; they are ambassadors for their club and the game and have a responsibility to represent each to the best of their ability.

Training in Youth Work will enable the players to provide support and opportunities to some of the country’s most vulnerable young people, as well as setting a platform for life after football.

If Youth Work interests you see http://www.central.wa.edu.au/Courses/HealthEduCommSvc/Pages/J024.aspx?cookieCheck=true# for more information.

Foyer opens at Leederville

An innovative program for homeless young people, the biggest of its kind in Australia, was officially opened by Premier Colin Barnett at Central’s campus in Leederville today.

The multimillion dollar Foyer Oxford  project will provide housing in an aspirational community of 98 young people, including 24 parents and their children, in a new purpose-built four-storey building on the Central campus. It is the first project of its kind in Western Australia.

The ambitious project – a partnership between Foundation Housing Limited; Central Institute of Technology and Anglicare WA – has been five years in planning and development. It is now part of an international movement of Foyer projects, providing a proven model of assisting young people at risk of homelessness to transition into independence.

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Foyer Oxford has attracted around $35 million in financial support from the corporate and government sectors, with capital funding received through the WA Department of Housing and Lotterywest. In what is a unique partnership in Australia, BHP Billiton and the WA Department for Child Protection and Family Support will provide joint operation funding over the first five years of the project.

Foundation Housing CEO Kathleen Gregory said the Foyer program attended to the root cause of the complex problem of homelessness which affected thousands of young people in WA.

“Every night, there are about 6,000 young Western Australians without a bed of their own. Most of them bounce from place to place, ‘couch surfing’ with friends, or cycling through institutional care,” she said.

“The Foyer program is different, and successful, because it focuses on people’s strengths and capacities, rather than their problems and deficits. It gives them what they need to really thrive.”

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Foyer Oxford is the first facility of its kind in WA and one of 1,000 Foyers across the world. The model is considered best practice because it provides at-risk young people, aged 16 to 25 years, with long-term transitional accommodation and comprehensive support, and ready access to education, training and employment opportunities.

Anglicare WA CEO Ian Carter AM said the Oxford Street project was founded on the success of significant overseas experience and the running of an Interim Foyer established in Mt Lawley, in 2011.

“The smaller-scale Foyer was the perfect testing ground. Fourteen young people, including four young parents and their children, were accommodated there and their success stories show that our approach has made a real impact,” he said.

“Many young people who came to the Interim Foyer from difficult circumstances, have now moved into their own home and are on their way to achieving really great things.”

Foyer Oxford provides multidimensional support for residents, facilitated by a skilled and committed professional team available 24/7. Assistance includes mentoring; links to recreational and community groups; workshops on every-day skills such as cooking and financial management; and assistance to find work in the local community.

“This is a great model that has been proved to succeed elsewhere around the world”, said Premier Colin Barnett.

“The facility brings with it a mutual obligation.  An obligation to provide an affordable rental, new, modern, attractive accommodation with security and safety.  With that, goes an obligation on residents to work on getting their lives in order, engaging in education or employment and then moving on to personal and social independence allowing another new group to come in here”, he said.

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Education is a critical factor and Central has designed a specific course for Foyer residents, called Jumpstart, which concentrates on career development, independent living skills, personal development, literacy and numeracy.

It is the first time an educational institution has been closely integrated into a social project of this kind and the successful model is now being replicated in other states around Australia.

It has been a project close to the heart of Central’s Managing Director Neil Fernandes, who has been a key part of the not-for-profit consortium which has pursued the development for five years.

“When my old colleague Ian Carter, now CEO of Anglicare, approached me about Central becoming involved I was keen,” Mr Fernandes said.

“Actively engaging and contributing to the community has always been at the core of our strategic plan and here was an opportunity to do that like never before.

“We had the land, which was put aside for student accommodation, and Anglicare and Foundation Housing had the skills and expertise. It seemed like the perfect match.

“It is our unsaid motto in TAFE that we change people’s lives and to be prominent in a project that clearly transforms people’s circumstances resonates well with us. “

The Jumpstart training program residents undertake was particularly geared to support people who had previously struggled in the education system.

Campus services, including the library, gym and counselling support, are also available to Foyer tenants.

The architect-designed Foyer Oxford building, on land provided by Central, provides a secure, attractive and affordable living space comprising 98 self-contained bedsit-style apartments and communal facilities, including a common room with entertainment equipment; garden and courtyard; laundry; training room; and barbecue area with platform for music performances.

On the ground floor, which is integrated in the Leederville streetscape, is a café, Pilates studio and meeting space for the Youth Affairs Council of WA. There are also specialised support services and facilities to assist young parents take up work and education.

The sophisticated building features sustainable and energy-conserving design, 24-hour security and electronic surveillance systems to ensure residents feel safe.

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